Standardised Packaging Campaign – Cancer Research UK

Featured Post on behalf of Cancer Research UK

Regular readers of this blog will know that I’ve recently taken part in Stoptober and managed to give up smoking. Starting smoking is an easy thing to do, but it’s a very difficult thing to stop and to make that stop permanent. The easiest way to make it a permanent stop is to never start in the first place.

One of the things I hated most about starting smoking again this year was (although I didn’t smoke in the house, nor in front of my boy) that I didn’t want him to see me smoking as a normal or accepted thing for us to do. My parents smoked like troopers while I was growing up and made it seem very normal. Children should never see it as normal or accepted behaviour.

Lots of people very kindly followed my progress and amongst those were the good people at Cancer Research UK. They’ve asked if I’d highlight their latest campaign on my blog which I am very happy to do.

On Monday 11th November Cancer Research UK launched a new film to support their ongoing campaign for standardised tobacco packaging products.

Every year in the UK 207,000 11-15 year olds take up smoking – that’s 570 children every day! Addiction keeps them smoking into adulthood, where it then kills one in two long-term users. Since tobacco advertising became illegal in the UK in 2002, tobacco companies have invested a fortune in branded packaging to attract new smokers. Most of these new smokers are children, with more than 80% of smokers starting by the age of 19.

The Cancer Research UK video showing how children respond to branded cigarette packs gives you an idea of how powerful this glamorous tobacco packaging can be There is strong evidence that removing glitzy designs from cigarette packs makes them less attractive to children. Plain, standardised packaging won’t stop everyone from smoking – but it will give millions of children one less reason to start.

What does ‘standardised packaging’ actually mean?

Plain standardised packaging means all cigarette packs will look the same. They are packaged in a standard shape without branding, design or a logo:

  • Health warnings will remainAttachment-1
  • Brand names will be in standard type face, colour and size
  • The shape, colour and method of opening the packet will be standardised
  • The duty paid stamp will remain with covert markings that show the pack is not counterfeit
  • Cigarette packs are also standardised in size and colour

photo (2)

For more information on the campaign and how you can get involved visit

Watch the video here

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