Tag Archives: Bostik

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

It’s rare a craft tutorial comes with a soundtrack, but I’ve had this earworm the whole time I’ve been making this space craft, so it’s only fair to pass it on. This month Craft Merrily have challenged the Bostik Bloggers to create a space themed craft. I was very happy with this brief as my son has a space themed bedroom and I knew whatever I made would end up hanging from his ceiling being admired by 6 year olds. 

I decided to create a planet and I wanted to make one with rings because they’re prettier right? I didn’t want to do Saturn as that was too obvious, so my husband suggested Uranus as it does have rings. 

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

For more information about Uranus, visit https://www.nasa.gov/uranus

How to make your own Uranus

You will need:
1 polystyrene ball
Half a sheet of tissue paper
A “ring” of cardboard cut to fit the ball
Glue
Blue and silver paint
Bostik White Glu
A length of fishing line

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

How to make Uranus:

Using an egg cup to balance your polystyrene ball on, carefully tear up the tissue paper into pieces a few centimetres square and stick onto the ball using the glue. Once covered, leave it to dry for an hour or so.

Once dry, carefully put the cardboard ring around your planet. The ring should be cut to fit the ball snuggly. 

When the ring is in place, paint over your planet and its ring in blue (or whichever colour you choose, your planet, your rules). You might need to give it a few coats, but remember to leave it to try in between. If you’re in a hurry, a hairdryer can be used to gently speed up the drying process.

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

Once the blue base coat is dry and you are happy it doesn’t need more coats, paint over with silver paint. I wanted the silver paint to seem a bit like gases, so I dabbed it all over the planet and the rings so you could still see the blue underneath. Leave this to dry (again, carefully use a hairdryer if you’re in a rush).

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

When Uranus is dry, take a length of clear fishing line and cut it to the required length. Tie a knot in the middle and thread the pin through the knot and tie it tight. Stick the pin in Uranus, thinking about how you want the planet to hang. I thought it would look pretty at a slightly jaunty angle, so I went with that.

I was going to embellish my planet with sequins and shiny stars, but it was so pretty as it was that I thought I would leave it as it is. If you decide to make your own Uranus, or another planet of your choosing, then you can paint it or embellish it however you’d like. 

I’m really pleased with how my Uranus has turned out. I know my son will enjoy adding it to his bedroom planetarium.

Craft Tutorial: Recreating Uranus (other planets are available)

Note: I am a Bostik craft blogger and I was sent the materials to create this craft from Craft Merrily. 

Check out my other craft tutorials here!

Craft Tutorial: Kusudama origami flowers

I’ve been part of a local craft club for a little over a year now. We meet once a month for an evening of crafts and each month we try something different. At the first craft club meeting I went to we learned how to make kusudama origami flowers. They are pretty simple to make and once you get into the rhythm, making them becomes addictive. 

Craft Tutorial: Make your own kusudama origami flowers

All you need are some squares of paper and some Bostik glue dots. I added a button and a pipe-cleaner stem, but a lot of kusudama origami flowers don’t have these. It’s easier to make them with thinner paper rather than card. They’d work well with nice wrapping paper cut into squares for example.

Craft Tutorial: Make your own kusudama origami flowers

You can use squares of paper of any size depending on the size of flower you want to make. You will need to make the petal segments in odd numbers. You’ll need to make a minimum of 5 segments, but 7 is a good number to make. I’ve seen them with 15 petal segments and more. Once you’ve got the knack you can really get creative with your kusudama origami flowers.

There are lots of design ideas on Pinterest if you want to take a look. My friend made 20 kusudama origami flowers and attached them to a string of fairy lights with the light shining through the centre of the flower. I have a bouquet of them in a small vase on my dining table. 

It’s much easier to show you how to fold the petal segments and put the flower together than it is to try and explain. I’ve made a video tutorial to walk you through it. 

Making kusudama origami flowers is a lovely little craft to know how to make. It’s a good entry level origami craft and one which you can do with the kids too. A bouquet of colourful kusudama origami flowers would make a lovely gift for flower loving friends, relatives or teachers. Say it with paper flowers?

Craft Tutorial: Make your own kusudama origami flowers

Note: I am a Bostik craft blogger and I was sent the materials to create this craft from Craft Merrily. 

Check out my other craft tutorials here!