Giveaway & Review: Oi Frog Memory Card Game #AD

AD/Gifted When my son was starting to learn to read, one of the books which really (really, really) got him excited about reading was Oi Frog (swiftly followed by Oi Dog). Oi Frog is the award-winning storybook written by Kes Gray and it has been brought to life in this new and easy to play memory card game; the Oi Frog Memory Card Game.

Although the game is designed for pre-schoolers, improving my son’s memory is something the school have asked us to focus on at home. Memory games are ideal for giving all of our brains a bit of a workout.

Review: Oi Frog Memory Card Game

The Oi Frog Memory Card Game comes in a lovely illustrated tin. There are a number of sheets of cards which you pop out, as well as a card with the rules of the game on. There are 56 picture cards in the set. Each card has an Oi Frog illustration on and there are two of each one; so two frogs, two logs, two puffins and two muffins etc. Each card features the familiar illustrations from Oi Frog from illustrator Jim Field.

The game is incredibly simple to play; turn all the cards picture side down, then take it in turns to find a matching, or rhyming pair. By rhyming pair I mean a frog and a log, or a puffin and a muffin. The person with the most pairs at the end of the game wins. The trick is remembering which cards are where, so you can find a matching or rhyming pair when it’s your turn.

Review: Oi Frog Memory Card Game

The Oi Frog Memory Card Game is ideal for boosting memory skills (for people of all ages); and can help little ones learn about co-operation and taking turns. My son is 8 now and although this game is suitable for ages 3+, we all had a lot of fun playing it. It really flexed my aging memory muscles and we all really enjoyed it. It’s absolutely the kind of game we will play again and again.

The Oi Frog Memory Card Game costs around £10.95 and is available online and in good toy shops.

WIN An Oi Frog Memory Card Game

To be in with a chance to win an Oi Frog Memory Card Game, simply complete the Rafflecopter widget below. Good luck!

Check out our other giveaways over on our competitions page.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms & Conditions:
1. The competition is open to residents of the UK only aged (18) and over.
2. The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative is offered.
3. To enter, please use the Rafflecopter widget above, complete any mandatory entries and any optional entries you would like.
4. The winner will be chosen at random from all valid entries.
5. The winner will be sent an Oi Frog Memory Card Game.
6. The closing date for entries is 11.59pm GMT on 31st March 2019.
7. The winner will be informed by email within 7 days of the closing date.
8. The winner will be asked to provide a full UK postal address with postcode for delivery purposes.
9. The winners name will be available on request
10. Address details be shared with Paul Lamond Games so they can send the prize to the winner.
11. Entry to this giveaway confirms that participants have read, understood and agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.
12. HodgePodgeDays decision is final in all matters relating to this giveaway.

Disclosure: We were sent an Oi Frog Memory Card Game for review purposes. All images and opinions are our own.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre, York

Since it opened in 1984, the JORVIK Viking Centre in York has been a popular place to visit to learn about Viking life. I remember going there on a school trip a few years after it opened. I was really taken with the recreation of a Viking settlement, complete with sounds and smells!

Over half term I took the boy for the day. We were visiting York for the JORVIK Viking Festival and we figured the JORVIK Viking Centre would be a good place to start. We arrived bright and early, which was just as well as on busy days the queue to get in can snake around the square.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre, York

When you enter, beyond the ticket office you walk down a flight of stairs (a lift is available) and enter a large room with a glass floor. Underneath the glass floor you can see the remains of the archaeological dig which the site it built upon. Around the walls there are information panels telling the story of the JORVIK Centre and some pieces which they uncovered during the dig.

A guide dressed in Viking clothes welcomed us and talked us through what we were standing on and what you can see through the glass. He also told us about the 2015 flood which filled the centre with water and closed it for almost two years. The JORVIK Viking Centre reopened in 2017. The closure meant that they could refresh and update the centre; so it’s almost how I remembered it, but more modern and a bit better.

After you’ve explored the room with the glass floor, you join a short queue for the Time Warp. This is probably one of the most famous things about JORVIK. You climb into a car and it takes you back to 975 AD to a Viking settlement. There’s commentary to listen to and it takes you through all the sights, sounds and smells of Viking life. There are mannequins which I’m told are now modeled on the faces of actual Vikings; which makes things feel even more authentic.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre, York

All life is there in the Time Warp, from women cooking and shopping, and children playing; to butchers and fishermen at work. It really brings the living conditions to life and was a real talking point for my son. The old Time Warp which I remember really stayed with me, and this is no different. It’s a really accessible way of teaching Viking history.

From the Time Warp you move to the artifacts room which has over 800 finds from the site; with interactive displays and the chance to learn about life in the 10th century.  There are several Viking guides to greet you and talk to you about life as a Viking. When you enter the room you’re met by displays of two excavated skeletons, the information about them is incredible. There’s even a piece of fossilised poo on display, gross things always excite the children and this was no different.

There’s an interactive screen where you can learn about Viking musical instruments and listen to them being played. You can also watch Viking money being minted; try on a helmet and find out more about Viking combs; (apparently the Vikings were a tidy bunch, bathing weekly and keeping their hair and beards neat and tidy). There are lots of artifacts to look at, it’s fascinating and I would have liked to have really taken my time to look around it.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre, York

Beyond the artifact room is the gift shop, which is excellent. If you manage to leave without buying a Viking shield for an 8 year old, you’re a stronger person than me.

The JORVIK Viking Centre is an excellent way to bring history to life for children. It’s really well done and I’m pleased that it has been brought up to date following the flood. The 12 minute long Time Warp is the real attraction here. It’s the kind of thing I’d like to do twice, just to see the things I missed the first time. I know that visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre will really help my 8 year old’s understanding of the period, and that’s never a bad thing.

For more information about JORVIK Viking Centre in York, visit their website.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre, York

Frugal Recipe: Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

My husband is a yellow sticker bargain ninja. He’s forever coming home with bargains he’s found at the supermarket, some things go straight in the freezer, but fresh fruit and vegetables need to be used within a day or two.

This week he came home with two packets of  Mixed Roasting Vegetables from the Co-op which should have been £1.50 each, but were reduced to 83p each. The packs contained a small swede, 3 carrots, 2 parsnips and two medium sized onions. They were crying out to be used in a stew, so that’s what I did.

There was quite a lot of chopping involved in this stew, and I threw in some lentils and a leek I already had which was beginning to see better days. The result was so tasty and hearty that I’ll be making it again. It was a giant stew, which filled my slow cooker to the brim and took 8 hours to cook.

Frugal Recipe: Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

It fed our family for three meals. I made stew and dumplings, I turned it into a pie and I just served it as stew with mashed potato. I even managed to freeze a portion for a rainy day.

This recipe uses two of the packs of vegetables, but you can half the quantities of everything if you want to make a smaller stew. With the yellow sticker bargain, I reckon I made this huge stew for around £3.

Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

Ingredients:

2 medium sized onions, chopped
1 leek, sliced
1 tablespoon of oil, whatever you have
2 small swedes, diced
2 parsnips
3 carrots
2 large potatoes
75g  red lentils, rinsed
2.5 pints of vegetable stock (made with a stock cube)
1 tin of chopped tomatoes
2 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon of tomato puree
1 tablespoon of mixed herbs
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon of sugar
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon of sweet chilli sauce
1 tablespoon of tomato ketchup

How to make your Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

Chop you onions and cook them in half a tablespoon of oil until they are soft. Add them to the slow cooker when soft. Slice your leek and fry that until tender in the rest of the oil. Add the garlic towards the end of cooking and stir that through for a few minutes, when that’s cooked, tip the leeks and garlic into the slow cooker.

Peel and chop your swedes, carrots, parsnips and potatoes into similar sized pieces and add to the slow cooker.

Switch your slow cooker onto high and add the stock, chopped tomatoes, lentils and the rest of the ingredients. Put the lid on and cook until all the root vegetables are soft, for me this took 8 hours.

Once the vegetables are cooked, taste the stew and add more seasoning if you think it needs it. Stir through and serve however you want.

Frugal Recipe: Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

My favourite way we had the stew was with dumplings. It was just the most perfect warming, hearty meal and I know I’ll be craving stew and dumplings now every time the temperature dips. My husband loved the pie, which was just a dish of the stew, which I stirred a tablespoon of vegetable gravy granules through and topped with a puff pastry lid. But it’s just as good served with a pile of buttery mash.

If you enjoyed this, you might like to try these slow cooker recipes:

Frugal Recipe: Slow Cooker Root Vegetable Stew

St Patrick’s Day Craft: How to make Paper Shamrocks

These Paper Shamrocks are so easy and really fun to make. We spent Saturday afternoon making all kinds of crafts and these were our favourite. They’re pretty quick to make, especially if you use a stapler and it wouldn’t take any time at all to rustle up enough to really decorate a room for St Patrick’s Day.

The idea is very similar to the paper heart wreath I made for Valentine’s Day. The 3D hearts are very simple to make with a strip of paper and look really effective when put together into a wreath or shamrock.

St Patrick’s Day Craft: How to make Paper Shamrocks

HOW TO MAKE A PAPER Shamrock

You will need
Green paper or card, A4 size
Scissors
A ruler and pencil
Stapler with staples
A length of ribbon if you’re hanging your shamrock

How to make your Paper Shamrock

Using a ruler measure the long side of your piece of paper and divide that length by five. Measure out five equal widths of paper and carefully cut into strips using a pair of scissors. If you’re doing this with children then you may want to be in charge of this bit.

Fold four of the strips in half, make sure you’ve got a neat, crisp fold here, this will be the pointy bottom of your heart shape. Bend the edges together to create the heart shape and staple the ends together. Do this with all four strips of paper to make hearts.

St Patrick’s Day Craft: How to make Paper Shamrocks

With the fifth strip (see the picture) you want to fold it into a very tall triangle shape with a flat bottom. Staple the ends together.

Lay the heart shapes out with the pointy triangle in the middle. It’s easier to visualise how to put the paper shamrock together. I found it easier to line up the bottom two hearts with the top of the triangle stem and staple them together. Before you staple the other hearts to the top of the paper shamrock shape, make a loop with your ribbon and staple it in place, then staple the other hearts together and your paper shamrock is done.

Hang up your Paper Shamrocks wherever you like and celebrate St Patrick’s Day with pride!

St Patrick’s Day Craft: How to make Paper Shamrocks

Six Children’s Books about Vikings

Fresh from our adventures at the JORVIK Viking Festival in York, we’ve been full of love for all things Viking. While we were there I popped into a bookshop and picked up a few more books about Vikings to add to our collection.

We do really enjoy picking a topic and reading all about it. I try and match it with the things he’s learning at school too, I’m so pleased that this term he’s learning about Vikings at school, because who doesn’t love a Viking?

Six Children’s Books about Vikings

Vikings and Invaders (Hysterical Histories) by Anita Ganeri is a brilliant book for young Viking fans. It is a press-out and play book which is packed with curriculum appropriate information, Viking facts and lots of play value. There are Vikings and invaders to press-out and play with. We particularly enjoyed reenacting Viking scenes and playing with the press-out long boat!

Six Children's Books about Vikings

Anglo-Saxons & Vikings (Usborne History of Britain) by Hazel Maskell and Dr Abigail Wheatley is a really comprehensive book which covers Anglo-Saxon society; through the invasion of the Vikings and right up to the Battle of Hastings. This is a very detailed book which is easy to flick through to look up the information you need. This book is highly recommended if you’re learning about Vikings.

The World of Vikings by Robert Macleod – This 80 page, colourfully illustrated history book is full of facts about the Viking age. Each page is lush with illustrations and images, which really bring the facts to life. With maps, timelines, photographs of relics and illustrations about what life was like for Vikings, it’s filled with detail which will really capture the imagination of readers. Read our full review here.

Everything Vikings: All the Incredible Facts and Fierce Fun You Can Plunder (National Geographic Kids) by Nadia Higgins. Do you think of Vikings and think hats with horns and flying dragons? You may well be wrong. This National Geographic Kids book is packed with Viking facts and illustrations.

Horrible Histories Vicious Vikings by Terry Deary andMartin Brown. You can’t have a children’s history book round up without including at least one Horrible Histories book. This series is well known for being interesting and exciting for kids, as well as fact-packed and engaging. Vicious Vikings is no different, with facts about Viking Gods in wedding dresses, corpses on trial and death by booby-trapped statues, there’s something for every young Viking fan!

The Story of the Vikings Sticker Book by Megan Cullis. Everyone loves a sticker book, and this is a really good one. Follow the incredible story of the Vikings as they terrorized the coastlines of Europe for over 300 years; from their infamous adventures overseas to the splendid treasures they left behind. This is a beautifully illustrated sticker book, packed with information and photographic stickers of Viking helmets and axes, necklaces, chess pieces and even shoes.

There are some fantastic non-fiction books about Vikings available. These are the ones we have read and enjoyed, have we missed any?

If you enjoyed this, you might also like our five books about dragons, five books about dinosaurs or five books about bears.

Six Children's Books about Vikings

Kitchen Hacks: 10 tips for Slow Cooker Success

A few years ago Father Christmas kindly brought me a slow cooker. It sat unused for a few months because I didn’t think it would be that different to using my oven. How wrong was I? I’m now in love my slow cooker, I can throw a bunch of ingredients in, turn it on and then by teatime I’ve got a lovely meal to give my family.

My slow cooker is a very basic model, but that’s all I need. It turns cheap cuts of meat into fall-apart, tender meals my family love.  It costs much less to run than my oven and everything I put in there turns into a delicious cuddle of a meal.

Kitchen Hacks: 10 tips for Slow Cooker Success

Plus, and for me this is huge, I’m a vegetarian and I’ve discovered that cooking bland and boring quorn mince in the slow cooker makes it really delicious. I make all kinds of (quorn) mince meals in mine, from bolognaise to chilli and shepherd pie. Each and every time it’s delicious and I’ve served it to confirmed carnivores without complaint.

With a few years of slow cooking experience under my belt, today I’m sharing my tips for slow cooker success.

Pre-heat your slow cooker – like a pre-heated oven, a pre-heated slow cooker will speed up the cooking process. I like to switch it on so it’s warming while I’m preparing my meal to go in the cooker.

Prep the night before – if you’re planning on switching your slow cooker on in the morning before heading out to work, you can save time by doing all the prep you need the night before, then switch it on to cook as you’re leaving the house. I’ve seen lots of very organised people who prep a lot of slow cooker meals, put them in bags and freeze them, ready to be put in the slow cooker. I wish I was that organised!

Brown your meat – I often make stews in my slow cooker. It really lends itself to cooking cheaper cuts of meat, like shin of beef or oxtail. Before I put them in the pot, I usually brown my meat in a frying pan first. The second part of this tip is roll your meat in seasoned flour before you brown it; this will help to thicken the sauce while it’s cooking.

Cook some of your veg first – root vegetables are fine to go in raw, but I like to fry off onions, celery and mushrooms first. They can go in raw, but I think they give a better flavour if you have cooked them first.

Beware too much liquid – the slow cooker is not too great at thickening sauces on its own. Add just enough liquid when you’re cooking, you can always add more if it needs it.

Boil the kettle – Use hot liquids if you can to speed up cooking. If the recipe calls for stock, make sure it’s hot. This will save the slow cooker the effort of heating it up and hot liquids will speed up the cooking process.

Root veg at the bottom – if your recipe calls for root veg, it’s best to put it in the pot first, it’ll take some time to cook through until it’s tender, and the best way to do this is at the bottom of the cooker where the liquid is.

Leave it alone – it can be tempting when you’re cooking something which smells delicious to keep lifting the lid and taking a look. Every time you lift the lid the cooker will lose heat, this will add to your cooking time. It’s best to leave it and to check it and stir it only towards the end of the cooking time.

Best cooked low and slow – in my experience, slow cooker meals are best if they’ve been cooked on the low setting for longer. It’s tempting to whack things on high to get it to cook quicker, which is fine; but if you can, low and slow is best. One hour on high = two hours low.

Add fresh herbs right at the end – if your recipe calls for fresh herbs, add these at the very end. Dried herbs stand up remarkably well in the slow cooker, but fresh herbs will lose their vibrancy.

Those are my tips for slow cooker success. Have you got any tips you can add? Please comment below.

If you enjoyed this, you might like to try these slow cooker recipes:

Kitchen Hacks: 10 tips for Slow Cooker Success

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

Vikings are very much the flavour of the month in our house. We’ve been doing a lot of reading about Vikings, and the boy is learning about them at school. What better way to bring some Viking learning to life than to take a trip to York and visit the JORVIK Viking Festival.

The JORVIK Viking Festival takes place every February, and the start of the festival fell during our half term. This year the JORVIK Viking Festival runs from 20 – 27 February 2019. It’s a family friendly festival and the largest event of its kind in Europe. There are historic encampments, talks, tours, combat displays and much more, all during half term week. This year the festival has a special focus on the untold story of women in the Viking age.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

We arrived in York bright and early on the second day of the festival. Parking near the JORVIK Viking Centre, we were surprised at just how busy it was so early in the day. Just after 9am there were queues stretching around the courtyard to get into the Jorvik Centre. If you are planning to go, it’s probably an idea to pre-book fast track tickets beforehand.

Visiting the JORVIK Viking Centre is a great place to start. The Viking guides talk you and walk you through the archaeological dig; you go on a time travel ride which takes you through a Viking village and all life within it; and there’s a fascinating artifacts gallery to explore.

During the JORVIK Viking Festival, there are a number of areas within York where you will find Viking goings on. All of the events and activities are listed on the website, but we picked up a booklet which listed everything and had a map, and we found that much easier to follow.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

From the JORVIK Viking Centre we went to nearby Parliament Street where the Viking Encampment was located. The encampment is set up with Viking stalls, where you can watch craftsmen make wooden bowls, jewellery and Viking combs, as well as blacksmiths at work and even a Viking tattooist. At one end is a large tent where little ones can try their hands at making some Viking crafts. There’s even a Viking long-boat to have a look at. We really loved this area and returned to it several times during the day, the boy and I especially liked watching the wooden bowl making.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

Before lunch, we visited Barley Hall, which is tucked away in the backstreets of York. Barley Hall is a reconstructed medieval townhouse which was originally built around 1360 by the monks of Nostell Priory near Wakefield. Extended in the 15th century; Barley Hall went into a slow decline and was eventually bought by the York Archaeological Trust in 1987 and restored into the museum we see today.

It’s a really interesting museum, and during the Viking Festival, it is playing host to a number of special events and exhibits. We went along to see the Seers and Shamans: Magic in the Viking Age exhibit. There were lots of interactive activities for children to do, and lots to interest adults. It’s such an interesting museum, especially if you’re interested in domestic history.

Moving on from Barley Hall, we headed over to the St Sampson’s Square Stage to watch a Viking Shield Maiden do battle with a Viking Warrior. This was really interesting and my boy loved watching them battle. They battled and then talked us through each move and why they’d made each move. We learned a lot about how Vikings fought, and it was good to see some axe wielding and sword swinging close up.

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

We’d filled a whole day with Viking Festival fun, but somehow we’d hardly scratched the surface. There was so much more that we wanted to do and we were all regretting not booking a hotel for the night and staying another day. Next year perhaps.

The programme of events for the JORVIK Viking Festival is packed and varied; with something for every kind of Viking enthusiast. If you’re visiting it’s worth deciding beforehand what you can’t miss and what you’d like to see and do. Book ahead for anything the programme recommends you book for and do spend some time on Parliament Street, it’s brilliant.

The full programme of events for this years JORVIK Viking Festival is available at  www.jorvikvikingfestival.co.uk

 

Days Out: Visiting the JORVIK Viking Festival

Read my preview of the 2019 JORVIK Viking Festival here.

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

Sadly the days where the nation stopped for afternoon tea are behind us. I like baking cakes, so most weekends we do make time for a slice of cake and a mug of our favourite brew. With St David’s Day coming up I baked an Anglesey Cake, I do like to bake seasonally if I can.

Anglesey Cake is not especially well known. Anglesey Cake is darkened with treacle so it appears much richer than it is was often serves at weddings where the families were too poor to afford a proper wedding cake. It’s a light fruit cake which is fairly cheap to make and just the thing to serve for afternoon tea.

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

It’s certainly very easy to make, it rises well and looks a treat on the table. It would be a good bake for the novice baker to try.

Anglesey Cake

Ingredients:

100g butter or margarine
75g soft brown sugar
2 tablespoons of black treacle
1 egg
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground mixed spice
1/2 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda
200ml milk
100g raisins
75g currants

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

How to make Anglesey Cake:

Pre-heat your oven to 180° and grease a deep cake tin (I uses an 8 inch tin). I also lined my cake tin with baking parchment for good measure.

Cream the butter or margarine with the sugar. Once it’s light and fluffy, add the egg and treacle and combine. Sift the flour, ginger and mixed spice into the mix and gently mix into a thick batter.

Stir the bicarb into the milk and whisk until it is fully dissolved, gradually stir this into the cake mixture, add the dried fruit and make sure the cake mix is well combined. Pour the cake batter into the cake tin and bake for 50-60 minutes.

Once it’s baked, remove from the oven and leave to cool. The cake is best baked 24 hour hours before you plan to eat it. It’s nice served plain with a good strong cup of tea, but I like it with some nice crumbly cheese like Caerphilly. Fruit cake and cheese is a traditional combination, believe it or not.

Whether you’re baking this as a St David’s Day treat, or just because you like the look of it, it’s a lovely light fruit cake which won’t break the bank to bake. Happy St David’s Day!

If you enjoyed this, you might also like my “works every time” Victoria Sponge Recipe.

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

 

FREE Printable: Bookmarks for Adult Colouring

If you’re an avid reader, how do you keep track of where you are up to? Do you leave your book open at the page? Do you fold a corner over, or do you use some kind of bookmark? Have you ever thought of making your own bookmarks?

A nice bookmark can take pride of place between the pages of your book. There’s something really lovely about a good bookmark. In the past I’ve used everything from bus tickets to post it notes to mark where I’m up to in a book, but that’s usually a temporary solution. To solve the problem, I have designed four very different bookmarks to print and colour myself.

They’re really simple to do. Just print them out on card, colour them in however you like; cut them out and they’re ready to go. If you’re feeling fancy you can punch a hole in the top and thread through some ribbon or a tassel to give your bookmarks a bit of finesse. To make your coloured bookmarks last forever, you could cut them out and laminate them.

Modern bookmarks are available in a wide variety of materials in a range of designs and styles. Many are made of card, but you can also find bookmarks made from paper, ribbon, fabric, felt or plastic.

Some bookmarks can be very ornate and expensively made, some people use bus tickets, post-it notes or scraps of paper to mark where they are up to in a book. If you know someone who uses an old bus ticket, why not make them a pretty bookmark they can treasure and enjoy using forever. Sharing is caring and all that!FREE Printable: Bookmarks for Adult Colouring

Download your FREE Bookmarks for Adult Colouring here.

There are four really different designs to colour in. Which is your favourite?

If you enjoyed this, I have quite a wide and varied selection of printables here, including these Valentine’s bookmarks for children.

FREE Printable: Bookmarks for Adult Colouring

Win a copy of Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space

Last week we reviewed The Amazing World of Animals, a Paperscapes books from Carlton Books. This week we are taking a look at Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space. The Paperscapes books are beautiful hardback books, filled with die-cut images and facts and information about space.

Discover space as you’ve never seen it before! Take a look at the most fascinating machines to explore the solar system and beyond. As you fly past the planets you’ll meet space probes, robotic rovers, satellites, space stations, rockets and more. Discover something new with every turn of the page.

The Spectacular Journey Into Space takes a look at the wonders that can be found in space, both natural and man-made. Unlike the other books in the Paperscapes series, the The Spectacular Journey Into Space features 29 photographs and a number of CGI images.

Win a copy of Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space

Written by Kevin Pettman, The Spectacular Journey Into Space is packed with all kinds of fascinating space facts. It’s an impressive collection to dip in and out of.

The Opportunity Rover has recently been in the news. It was built to last just 90 days, has ended its mission after 15 years on Mars. The Spectacular Journey Into Space tell us that Opportunity carries cameras for three different purposes; navigation, avoiding hazards and collecting images for research purposes. It was also launched by a Delta II heavy rocket and a landing craft carried it onto the surface of Mars. These are all great facts my son can look up whenever he wants.

The Spectacular Journey Into Space is suitable for children aged 7+. My 8 year old son absolutely loved it and found it an easy and interesting read. The language isn’t too simple and older children and even teenagers would find the book interesting and enjoyable.

Besides the facts, the really interesting thing about The Spectacular Journey Into Space are the dye-cut images. Many are photographs or CGI recreations and they really leap off the page. Each image has perforations around it, you pop out the surroundings leaving the image to stand out within its frame. It’s very well done and makes it a joy to read and look at.

If you like the idea of these Paperscapes books, but space isn’t your thing, there are three other books in the series –  The Incredible World of BugsThe Amazing World of Animals and The Fearsome World of Dinosaurs.

Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space by Kevin Pettman is published by Carlton Books and costs £12.99. It is available online and from good bookshops.

WIN A COPY OF Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space

To be in with a chance to win a copy of Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space, simply complete the Rafflecopter widget below. Good luck!

Check out our other giveaways over on our competitions page.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Terms & Conditions:
1. The competition is open to residents of the UK only aged (18) and over.
2. The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative is offered.
3. To enter, please use the Rafflecopter widget above, complete any mandatory entries and any optional entries you would like.
4. The winner will be chosen at random from all valid entries.
5. The winner will be sent a copy of Paperscapes – The Spectacular Journey Into Space.
6. The closing date for entries is 11.59pm GMT on 17th March 2019.
7. The winner will be informed by email within 7 days of the closing date.
8. The winner will be asked to provide a full UK postal address with postcode for delivery purposes.
9. The winners name will be available on request
10. Address details be shared with Carlton Books so they can send the prize to the winner.
11. Entry to this giveaway confirms that participants have read, understood and agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.
12. HodgePodgeDays decision is final in all matters relating to this giveaway.

Disclosure: We were sent a copy of Paperscapes – The Amazing World of Animals for review purposes. All images and opinions are our own.