Category Archives: Recipe

Simple Recipe: Scotch Whisky Syllabub

If you’re planning a Burns Night celebration and you’re looking for a simple but slightly different pudding for the night, this rich and easy Whisky Syllabub recipe really hits the spot. If you can whip cream, open a bottle of whisky and zest a lemon, then this recipe is for you.

Syllabub in various forms has been around since the 16th century. Originally a frothy, milky concoction, made with sweet wine or cider; it has evolved from a hearty, warming drink to the whipped pudding we eat today. Syllabubs are similar to possets and are closely related to the famous Scottish pudding, cranachan. I’ve given a standard syllabub a Burns Night makeover and swapped out the sweet wine for whisky, and it really works!

Simple Recipe: Scotch Whisky Syllabub

This recipe for Scotch Whisky Syllabub takes no time at all to put together and makes enough for four good-sized portions, or 6 smaller ones. It is very rich though, so a smaller portion might be better. Serve it with homemade shortbread and raspberries. Delicious!

Scotch Whisky Syllabub

Ingredients:

55g caster sugar
1 lemon, zested
3 tbsp lemon juice
300ml double cream
25g icing sugar
100ml whisky

Simple Recipe: Scotch Whisky Syllabub

How to make Whisky Syllabub:

In a small saucepan, warm the sugar, lemon juice and finely grated zest until the sugar is dissolved. Stir the mixture a little to encourage the sugar to dissolve, once it has, leave it to cool completely. This shouldn’t take long, maybe 15 minutes.

In a large mixing bowl whip your double cream and icing sugar together until it goes in soft to medium peaks. I used a hand mixer for this as whipping it by hand would take me an age.

Add your whisky to the pan of juice and swirl it around, pour it into the cream mixture and fold the whisky and juice into the cream with a spatula. For good measure I gave it a quick 10 second mix with my hand mixer too.

Spoon the whisky syllabub into nice glasses and put in the fridge and chill for an hour or so. It’s fine to make it the day before and chill it overnight if you’d like. It’s also absolutely fine to serve it there and them without chilling it, it’ll just have a slightly softer texture.

Serve with some homemade shortbread and raspberries. It’s a fantastically simple pudding and one to impress the grown ups at any Burns Night celebration!

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Simple Recipe: Scotch Whisky Syllabub

Recipe: Homemade Haggis Pasties

With Burns Night fast approaching, my local butchers have stocked up with haggis. I’m always keen to try different things, so I popped in and picked up a small haggis, took it home and wondered what to make with it. Previously I’ve made a haggis, potato cake and poached egg stack, but this week I fancied making pasties from scratch. The pasties came out so well, I’ve decided to share my recipe for Homemade Haggis Pasties.

Recipe: Homemade Haggis Pasties

Haggis is one of those ingredients which is a bit love/hate. It’s not to everyone’s taste, but if you’re not already a haggis fan, they’re worth trying; my 8 year old scoffed a whole pasty and asked me to make them again, which really surprised me.

I’ve made Cornish pasties before, so I thought I’d make something similar, but with haggis, neeps and tatties. There was a bit of prep to be done, but the results are worth it, and I’ve got lunches for the boys for the next few days. The recipe makes 8 pasties if you’re pretty frugal with the pastry. I made my own shortcrust pastry, but as ever, there’s no shame in buying your own if you can’t face making it from scratch.

Homemade Haggis Pasties

Ingredients:
For the pastry:

450g plain flour
110g butter, margarine or lard
1/2 teaspoon of salt
5fl oz of water

1 egg, beaten

For the pasty filling:

1 small haggis weighing 450g
200g potato, diced
200g neeps (otherwise known as turnip), diced
1 small onion
1/2 carrot (optional)
1 teaspoon of butter
Salt and pepper

Recipe: Homemade Haggis Pasties

How to make your haggis pasties:

Begin my making your pastry as it benefits from being chilled for at least an hour, but longer is best. Sift the flour and salt into a large bowl, cube the fat and rub that into the flour until it resembles breadcrumbs, add the water and mix with your hands until it forms a dough. Don’t work the pastry too much, a light touch is best. Once the pastry has formed a dough, wrap it in plastic and put it in the fridge for at least an hour.

Once the pastry is chilling in the fridge, wrap your haggis in tin foil and bake it in the oven for an hour at 190°. Remove from the oven and leave to cool until you’re ready for it.

While the haggis is cooking; dice your neeps (turnip), potatoes and your half a carrot if you’re using and boil for 15 minutes until tender. Drain and put in a bowl, season well with salt and pepper and add a teaspoon of butter, put to one side. Finely dice a small onion and add that to the neeps and tatties.

When your haggis is cooked, remove it from the casing and add the haggis to the vegetable mix, stir well. Your filling is ready to be made into pasties.

Pre-heat your oven to 200°.  Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. To make your pasties, roll your pastry until it is about 5mm thick and using a side plate (I use a plastic one because it’s easier to handle) cut around the plate. You should get 7-8 pasties out of the pastry.

Recipe: Homemade Haggis Pasties

Heap 2 dessert spoons of the filling in the middle of the pastry circle. Brush along one half of the circle along the edge with the egg, fold over the pastry and press the edges together. Crimp your pastry, don’t worry, this seems harder than it is, and it’s easier for you to watch this video than it is for me to explain it. Once your pasty has been crimped, brush with the beaten egg, place on your baking tray and bake for 50 minutes.

Once your pasties have been baked, remove from the oven and leave to cool for at least ten minutes before eating.

The haggis pasties are delicious; all the familiar charm of a Cornish pasty, but with a Scottish twist which even my 8 year old enjoys!

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Recipe: Homemade Haggis Pasties

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

Homemade treats make for really lovely gifts at Christmas. These Fruit and Nutty Buttons are really fun to make and delicious too.

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

I’ve been making variations of these chocolate buttons since I found a silicone mold in a charity shop for £1 earlier in the year. I’ve made these a bunch of times with my son, they couldn’t be more simple. Melt some chocolate, pour it in the mold and decorate however you want.

As it’s Christmas I wanted to use some nuts in these buttons, so I made a batch of candied walnuts. They’re super easy and so delicious, we nearly ate the whole batch before we got chance to add them to the buttons.

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

Candied Walnuts

Ingredients:

200g walnuts
6 tablespoons of sugar
1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon
1 egg white
splash of water

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

How to make your candied walnuts:

Pre-heat your oven to 120° and put some baking parchment on a baking tray. In a bowl, whisk your egg white with a splash of water. In a different bowl, mix the sugar and cinnamon until it’s well combined.

Using a fork, dip each walnut in the egg white and then toss is in the sugar until it’s covered. Place the walnuts on the baking tray. Once all the walnuts are covered, put the tray in the oven and bake for 45 minutes or so. Make sure you turn the walnuts every 15 minutes so they cook evenly. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.

Fruit and Nutty Buttons

Ingredients:
250g of milk chocolate
A bag of mixed fruit and nuts
Candied walnuts
Small bag of white chocolate buttons

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

You will need:
A saucepan, a glass bowl which will sit in the pan, but so it doesn’t touch the bottom; a metal spoon, silicone baking molds.

How to make your fruit and nutty buttons:
Boil some water and pour the water into your pan so it’s about 3cm deep. Carefully place the glass bowl in the pan making sure the bottom of the bowl doesn’t touch the water. This is called a bain marie.

Break your chocolate up into small pieces and put it in the glass bowl. The water in the pan needs to be at a gentle simmer, not bubbling and boiling. Stir the chocolate until it is melted.

Once the chocolate is melted, with a spoon scoop out some melted chocolate into each of the molds. Try and put an equal amount in each. Gently shake the silicone tray so the chocolate settles.

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

Melt about half of your white chocolate buttons for drizzling. Take your fruit and nuts and decorate the buttons however you want. I did four different kinds –

  • Candied walnuts drizzled with white chocolate
  • Pecan nuts, dried cranberries and sultanas
  • Just candied walnuts
  • Plain white chocolate buttons

Leave them to cool for at least two hours. If you need them to set a bit faster you can pop them in the fridge. Once they’re set you can put them in little cellophane bags and decorate with ribbons.

They’re really delicious and the addition of fruit and nuts turns them from a fun chocolate treat into something a little more grown up. They’re such a lovely gift to give and receive, and really great to make with kids too.

Homemade Gifts: Fruit and Nutty Buttons

Christmas Recipe: Mulled Cider Jellies

At Christmas time I can’t get enough of mulled drinks. Mulled wine is a favourite but a few years ago I tried Mulled Cider and my head was turned. I’m more likely to drink Mulled Cider at home and it’s such a delicious and warming drink, it really sings Christmas to me.

When I mull at home, I usually use a ready-made spice sachet, usually one from Steenbergs because I can’t fault them. This Christmas I’ve been using the Spices for Spiced Cider and Apple Juice and they’ve really hit the spot. All you do is warm through a litre of cider or apple juice, tip one of the sachets in and after a few minutes it’s ready.

Christmas Recipe: Mulled Cider Jellies

Sometimes, and this is not very often, I mull too much cider and I’ll have some left. Sure, I could heat it up again later, but I fancied making something different with it. I thought I’d make some Mulled Cider Jellies. It turns out they make a really interesting, different and delicious festive dessert. You could make them just as well with apple juice if you’re serving them to children or people who don’t drink alcohol. This recipe makes 4 good-sized jellies.

Christmas Recipe: Mulled Cider Jellies

Mulled Cider Jellies

Ingredients:

1 pint of mulled cider or mulled apple juice
2 tablespoons of sugar
A sachet of Dr Oetker Vege Gel

How to make Mulled Cider Jellies:

Take about 200mls of your cooled mulled cider and stir the Vege Gel into it, make sure all the powder dissolves.

Add the sugar and bring the remainder of the cider to the boil, once it’s boiling, add your 200mls of cider and Vege Gel into the pan and stir, stir, stir.

Christmas Recipe: Mulled Cider Jellies

Make sure you have your moulds ready for your jelly as it will start to set really quite quickly. I used some small glass pyrex dishes and also a metal cake mould in the shape of a star. You could make one big jelly if you prefer.

Pour your jelly carefully into your serving dishes and put them in the fridge until it’s set properly. This took about two hours, but if you can it is probably worth leaving the jelly overnight in the fridge.

I turned my jelly mould out onto a serving plate, be careful when you do this so not to break the jelly.

Serve with good vanilla ice cream.

Be careful if you’re turning your jelly out of the moulds, I tried to move my jelly and ended up breaking a little piece off the corner which I then covered with ice cream, so it was all fine in the end.

It’s such a pretty little pudding, easy to do and something a bit different at Christmas.

If you enjoyed this, you might also like to try –

Christmas Recipe: Mulled Cider Jellies

I was sent some mulled cider spice by Steenbergs and decided to use in in this recipe. I have not been compensated for this post.

Recipe: Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

Chocolate brownies are universally popular. I know my family absolutely adore them and whenever I make a batch, they usually disappear far too quickly. Brownies are the kind of thing you can easily adapt for different occasions or tastes.

This week I’ve decided to bake the classic – chocolate and cherry brownies, but I gave them a festive twist and baked them with Opies Black Cherries with Luxardo Kirsch. They were so gooey and good – the perfect brownie!

Recipe: Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

Ingredients:

250g milk chocolate
250g unsalted butter
4 medium eggs
250g sugar
60ml of vegetable oil
2 heaped tablespoons self raising flour
2 heaped tablespoons cocoa powder
150g drained Opies Black Cherries with Luxardo Kirsch
2 shots of the Luxardo Kirsch which the cherries had been in

How to make your Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries:

Pre-heat your oven to 185° and line a deep sided baking dish with baking parchment.

In a bowl, over a pan of simmering water, melt the chocolate and the butter together until smooth. In a separate bowl, mix the sugar and the eggs, whisk them until they’re light and fluffy.

Pass the flour, cocoa powder through a fine sieve and add to the eggs and sugar. Gently whisk the ingredients together until combined. Then mix in the melted chocolate and the vegetable oil to combine. Stir through the cherries and kirsch and pour the batter into the tin.

Recipe: Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

Bake for 35-45 minutes until the brownies have lost their wobble but are still a bit gooey inside. Take out and leave to cool. You want to almost under bake them so it’s still soft in the centre.

Once they are cool, cut them into squares. I sprinkled my brownies with white chocolate stars and icing sugar to make them look a bit more festive.

Recipe: Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

I did have plans to make cherry chocolate brownie sundaes with them; layering them up with ice cream, whipped cream and drizzling more kirsch and cherries over the top. But I went out to work and when I came home they’d all gone, so you’ll have to use your imagination instead. The sundae sounded pretty tasty in my imagination!

Recipe: Chocolate Brownies with Boozy Cherries

Note: We were sent a jar of Opies Black Cherries with Luxardo Kirsch and I decided to use them in this recipe. I’ve not been compensated for this post.

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

Christmas is a season for entertaining. Having friends round for drinks and nibbles is something we do a lot. Whilst bowls of crisps and nuts are always a hit, serving a couple of homemade canapés makes me feel slightly more of a domestic goddess than I really am. This week I tested out these Puff Pastry Sausage Bites which I’ll be serving to guests on Christmas Eve. They were quickly gobbled up and given the seal of approval from the boys, so I’m sure your guests will like them too.

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

You could make them with whatever your favourite sausage is, I used some Grouse and Wild Boar sausages from Wild and Game. Wild and Game are a non-profit organisation with the main aim of introducing the British public to game meat. They have a range of game-based pies, pasties, sausage rolls and sausages and want to show that game meat isn’t just for special occasions. Game is a healthy choice and is generally low-fat and low-cholesterol.

My Puff Pastry Sausage Bites are so easy to make, especially if you cheat like me and buy ready-made puff pastry. They’re a crispy canapé, full of gamey flavour which is complimented by a dab of redcurrant jelly. They’re festive without being too in your face about it.

Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

Makes 24 Sausage Bites.

Ingredients:

1 sheet of ready-made puff pastry
A pack of Grouse and Wild Boar Sausages (or your favourite sausages)
Redcurrant jelly, I used just over a tablespoon
1 beaten egg

How to make your sausage bites:

Pre-heat your oven to 200° and put a sheet of baking parchment on a baking tray. Unroll your sheet of puff pastry and using a sharp knife divide it up into 24 squares.

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

I used a shot glass to press a circle into the middle of each of the squares, you just need the indent rather than cutting through. This should stop the whole pastry square from rising in the oven.

Carefully transfer each square onto your baking sheet. You might need to bake them in batches so don’t cram them in. Using a teaspoon, put a small dollop of redcurrant jelly in each of the circles. You don’t need much, maybe 1/4 of a spoon.

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

Now is the slightly messy bit. Take a sausage and squeeze the filling out of it put a piece of the sausage-meat on top of each circle. Each sausage should be enough for 6 sausage bites. You should use just 4 sausages for this recipe, if you’ve got a packet of 6 sausages you could make yourself a sausage butty with the last two sausages for your lunch.

Once each square has some redcurrant jelly and sausage-meat in it, brush around the edges of the pastry with the beaten egg and put in the oven. Bake for 15-18 minutes until golden brown. Remove from the oven and leave to cool slightly before serving.

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

If you enjoyed this recipe, you might also like to try –

Canapé Recipe: Puff Pastry Sausage Bites

I was sent some Wild and Game sausages to use in a recipe. All images and opinions are my own. I have not been compensated for this post.

How to make your own Quince Gin

A few weeks ago I knocked up a batch of Parma Violet Gin, and very acceptable it was too. Buoyed on by my gin making triumph, and somewhat overwhelmed by a glut of quinces, I decided to try my hand at making some Quince Gin.

Quince Gin, or any fruit flavoured gin is really easy to do, you just need a big jar, some fruit, a bit of sugar, gin and some time.

I’ve never really drunk much quince gin before and now that I have, I find it hard to understand why it’s not more of a thing. It’s not sweet and sickly, but it’s delicately perfumed, just like the fruit and it’s really very special.

How to make your own Quince Gin

We have a quince tree in our garden, so most autumns we are blessed with a fairly decent crop of fruit. Most of this goes towards making quince jelly, which is excellent with cheese, but this year I put aside two nice big quinces for ginning with. It’s simple to do, you just need patience.

How to make your own Quince Gin

You will need:

380mls Gin, I used the cheap stuff from Aldi
2 large quinces
30g sugar
A large jar
Coffee filters or muslin
A funnel
A nice bottle

How to make Quince Gin:

The first thing I did was measure how much gin my decorative bottle would take. My bottle would hold 350mls of gin, so allowing for a little bit of wastage during the straining process, and me having a little taste, I measured out 380mls of gin and poured it into a large sterilised jar.

To sterilise your jars and bottles, put your clean jars in a low oven for at least half an hour. Carefully remove your jars from the oven (they will be incredibly hot) and allow them to cool down a little.

Chop up your two clean quinces as small as you can be bothered to do. I removed the small core and the pips. Once they’re all chopped up, add them to your large jar and top up with 30g of sugar. Put the lid on your jar and give it a good shake.

How to make your own Quince Gin

Now, the fruit at the top of the jar might be a bit exposed to the air; this bothered me, so I took a piece of baking paper and made a cartouche of sorts. A cartouche is just a bit of paper which you cover the top of food with when you’re cooking to make sure the contents are submerged. This stops the quince at the top of the jar from going brown.

Put the jar to one side, making sure you shake the jar every few days. Leave the quince to sit in the gin for 3-6 weeks.

When the time is up, take your sterilised bottle and using a funnel with some muslin or a coffee filter in it; strain the gin into the bottle. I found that it was best if I strained it twice. Just make sure you replacing the muslin with a new piece after the first straining.

How to make your own Quince Gin

Seal your bottle and decorate it with a nice label if you’re giving it as a gift. I’ve called this gin “Two Quinces” after the 1992 Spin Doctors song, you’re welcome.

If you’ve got some quince to spare, you might also like to try this recipe for Goats Cheese & Caramelised Onion Galette with quince.

How to make your own Quince Gin

Christmas Gifts: Make your own Rosemary Herb Oil

I love fresh herbs, I chop them and throw them into almost everything. I have a few herb plants in my garden which I am forever bothering with a pair of scissors. Rosemary, thyme and bay are standards in my kitchen. During the summer months we can’t grow enough parsley, coriander and basil to meet our needs. We are herb addicts and herb oil is a big part of that.

One of the things I like to do is make my own herb oils. They’re lovely to cook with and drizzle over things and they’re ridiculously easy to make too. Now is exactly the right time of year to be making a few bottles of herb oils to give to foodie friends and family for Christmas and they look really pretty too.

Make your own Rosemary Herb Oil

Because I’ve been busy making rosemary oil, below you’ll find the recipe for that below. But you can use the exact same technique with any woody herb. You can even do it with chillis, which you prick with a pin all over and push into the bottle to steep in the oil.

How to make Rosemary Herb Oil

You will need:

A decorative glass bottle
Some springs of rosemary (or other woody herb)
Olive oil (enough to fill the bottle

Make your own Rosemary Herb Oil

How to make herb oil:

In a small saucepan, pour in the amount of oil you need and warm gently. You don’t want the oil to be hot or bubbling, just warm enough to encourage the oils out of the herbs.

Take your sprigs of rosemary (or whatever woody herb you’re using) and using a rolling pin, roll over the sprigs a couple of times. This will crush the leaves slightly to encourage the herb oils to permeate the oil. Poke your sprigs into your clean and sterilised glass bottle.

If you’re not sure how to sterlise your bottle, I usually put it in the dishwasher on the hottest setting, then put it in a low oven for half an hour. Carefully remove the bottle and leave it to cool a little, so you can handle it, but no so it’s cold.

With the slightly crushed sprigs in the glass bottle, carefully (very carefully) pour the warmed oil into the bottle and seal it shut. Put to somewhere to cool and leave it for a couple of weeks before using the rosemary oil.

Uses for rosemary oil

  • For roasting chicken or lamb
  • For roasting vegetables
  • Adding extra flavour to soups and stews
  • For dipping bread into

You can happily recreate this using thyme or marjoram, or with pricked chillis as I suggested earlier. They really do make a pretty gift for a foodie, especially if you write a pretty label for the bottle.

If you enjoyed this, you might like to try making your own parma violet gin.

Make your own Rosemary Herb Oil

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

Everyone loves a good sausage roll and vegetarians are no different. It’s pretty much impossible to find them in high street bakers, but they’re so easy to make I usually bake up a batch by myself. This week I wanted to ring the changes, so I baked a batch of these Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls and very, very good they are too.

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

I’ve been vegetarian for nearly 30 years now and I’ve never tried black pudding, real or vegetarian. I spotted some in my local butchers (I know right, a vegetarian who goes to the butchers) and bought some veggie black pudding with no real plan for it. After a bit of thought I decided that Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls sounded like they’d be a good combination, and I was right.

Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

Ingredients:

1 sheet of ready rolled puff pastry
150g pack of Granose Meat Free Lincoln Sausage Mix
100g The Bury Black Pudding Company Vegetarian Black Pudding
2 tablespoons of parsley, chopped
Salt & Pepper
1 egg, beaten

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

How to make Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls:

Take your pastry out of the fridge and pre-heat your oven to 200°. Cover a baking sheet with a piece of greaseproof paper.

Make up the mix of Granose Meat Free Lincoln Sausage according to the packet instructions. I found this to be a good substitute for sausage meat. Chop up 100g of vegetarian black pudding as finely as you can and add it to the sausage mix. Stir through your chopped parsley and season with salt and pepper. Mix well.

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

Unroll your sheet of puff pastry. Cut your pastry sheet in half length-ways. Spoon a thick line of sausage mixture along the middle of each piece of pastry and paint beaten egg in a line along one edge of the pastry. Roll the sausage up and make sure the pastry edge is sealed well. Cut the long sausage roll down into smaller sausage rolls.

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

I cut each of the two long sausages down to 5, so I had 10 in total. But you can decide how big you want each roll to be. Place them on your baking sheet with the sealed side down. Slash the top of the pastry with a sharp knife and brush with beaten egg. Put them in the oven for 20 minutes, until golden brown and delicious.

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

I have to confess, my meat-eating husband whet mad for these. He said they were the best he’d ever had and asked me to make another batch asap. They’re just the thing for Christmas get togethers and really quite different to normal sausage rolls. Maybe stir a couple of spoons of cranberry sauce into the mix if you want to make them more festive. They’re good, really good.

If you enjoyed this recipe, you might also like to try these easy cheaty sausage rolls.

Recipe: Vegetarian Black Pudding Sausage Rolls

How to make your own Parma Violet Gin

I don’t do much drinking at home, I like to save myself for a (now rare) night out or trip to a festival. Back in the spring I went to a Gin Festival with some good friends, my first tipple of the day was some quite expensive Parma Violet Gin and it’s been on my mind ever since. Sure, I could buy a bottle, but the Willy Wonka in me fancied making some. It’s so easy, and it’s the perfect homemade gift for a Parma Violet loving gin fan this Christmas!

How to make your own Parma Violet Gin

How to make Parma Violet Gin

You will need:

350mls Gin, I used the cheap stuff from Aldi
6 7g packets of Parma Violets
A large jar
Coffee filters or muslin
A funnel
A nice bottle

How to make Parma Violet Gin:

The first thing I did was measure how much gin my decorative bottle would take. My bottle would hold 350mls of gin, so allowing for a little bit of wastage during the straining process, and me having a little taste, I measured out 380mls of gin and poured it into a large sterilised jar.

How to make your own Parma Violet Gin

To sterilise your jars and bottles, put your clean jars in a low oven for at least half an hour. Carefully remove your jars from the oven (they will be incredibly hot) and allow them to cool down. Pour in your gin, I suggest you use a jug and a funnel for this.

Using whatever method you think best, grind up 6 packets of Parma Violets. I did this using a pestle and mortar, but a food processor or a bag and a rolling pin would work just as well. They don’t have to be super fine, but the more they’re broken up, the quicker they will dissolve.

Tip your crushed Parma Violets into the jar with the gin. Screw the lid on as tight as you can and give it a really good shake. Put it to one side, shaking the jar daily for about two weeks. A little more or a little less time in the jar won’t hurt.

In terms of measurements, if you want to make more or less of the Parma Violet Gin then you should go for a ratio of about 2 of the 7g packets of Parma Violets per 100mls.

When the time is up, take your sterilised bottle and using a funnel with some muslin or a coffee filter in it; strain the gin into the bottle. I found that it was best if I strained it twice, replacing the muslin with a new piece after the first straining. Doing this resulted in a clearer gin but didn’t seem to change the flavour much.

Once the bottle is filled, put the lid on, label it if you want and give it to your favourite gin lover.

If you liked the look of this recipe, you might also like to try baking these Parma Violet Shortbread Biscuits.

How to make your own Parma Violet Gin