Tag Archives: St David’s Day

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

Sadly the days where the nation stopped for afternoon tea are behind us. I like baking cakes, so most weekends we do make time for a slice of cake and a mug of our favourite brew. With St David’s Day coming up I baked an Anglesey Cake, I do like to bake seasonally if I can.

Anglesey Cake is not especially well known. Anglesey Cake is darkened with treacle so it appears much richer than it is was often serves at weddings where the families were too poor to afford a proper wedding cake. It’s a light fruit cake which is fairly cheap to make and just the thing to serve for afternoon tea.

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

It’s certainly very easy to make, it rises well and looks a treat on the table. It would be a good bake for the novice baker to try.

Anglesey Cake

Ingredients:

100g butter or margarine
75g soft brown sugar
2 tablespoons of black treacle
1 egg
2 teaspoons ground ginger
2 teaspoons ground mixed spice
1/2 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda
200ml milk
100g raisins
75g currants

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

How to make Anglesey Cake:

Pre-heat your oven to 180° and grease a deep cake tin (I uses an 8 inch tin). I also lined my cake tin with baking parchment for good measure.

Cream the butter or margarine with the sugar. Once it’s light and fluffy, add the egg and treacle and combine. Sift the flour, ginger and mixed spice into the mix and gently mix into a thick batter.

Stir the bicarb into the milk and whisk until it is fully dissolved, gradually stir this into the cake mixture, add the dried fruit and make sure the cake mix is well combined. Pour the cake batter into the cake tin and bake for 50-60 minutes.

Once it’s baked, remove from the oven and leave to cool. The cake is best baked 24 hour hours before you plan to eat it. It’s nice served plain with a good strong cup of tea, but I like it with some nice crumbly cheese like Caerphilly. Fruit cake and cheese is a traditional combination, believe it or not.

Whether you’re baking this as a St David’s Day treat, or just because you like the look of it, it’s a lovely light fruit cake which won’t break the bank to bake. Happy St David’s Day!

If you enjoyed this, you might also like my “works every time” Victoria Sponge Recipe.

Teatime Recipe: Anglesey Cake

 

FREE Printables: St David’s Day Colouring Sheets

St David’s Day is on 1st March and is a day of celebration of both St David’s life and the Welsh people and their culture. St David is the patron saint of Wales and on 1st March it is traditional for Welsh people to wear daffodils or leeks, both of these are the symbols of Wales. The wearing of a daffodil on 1st March, St David’s Day was made popular by the Victorians. In Wales the daffodil is also known as “Peter’s leek” and its Welsh name is “Cenhinen Bedr”.

St David was born in Wales and he founded a Celtic monastic community at Glyn Rhosyn. The monastery was located on the western headland of Pembrokeshire at the site where St David’s Cathedral stands today. The son of an aristocratic family; St David has been credited with many miracles; not least of which was his ability to survive on a diet almost exclusively made up of leeks and water. This is perhaps one of the reasons why leeks are one of the national symbols of Wales.

FREE Printables: St David's Day Colouring

On this special day, Welsh people celebrate with parades, eisteddfods and meals of leek soup and Welsh lamb. Some people like to dress in traditional Welsh costume; which consists of a long wool skirt, apron, white blouse, woollen shawl and a Welsh hat.

Click here to download your FREE Welsh Dragon colouring sheet.
Click here to download your FREE Daffodil colouring sheet.

If you are marking St David’s Day, I’ve made some FREE colouring printables which your family might enjoy. From a lovely Welsh dragon, to a proud looking daffodil; these free printables will help your family celebrate St David’s Day.

If you enjoyed this post, you might want to try your hand at making this lovely cheery popsicle stick daffodil flower or maybe this egg box dragon.

Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Hapus!

FREE Printables: St David's Day Colouring

Kids Crafts: How to make a cheery Daffodil flower

With the first signs of spring slowly making an appearance, and with St David’s Day around the corner, what better craft to make than a cheery daffodil or two. This lovely daffodil craft is perfect for toddlers and small children to make. It’s very simple to make and little ones will be as pleased as punch with their efforts.

St David’s Day is on 1st March and is a day of celebration of both St David’s life and the Welsh people and their culture. St David is the patron saint of Wales and on 1st March it is traditional for Welsh people to wear daffodils or leeks, both of these are the symbols of Wales. The wearing of a daffodil on St David’s Day was made popular by the Victorians, in Wales it is also known as “Peter’s leek” and its Welsh name is “Cenhinen Bedr”.

Kids Crafts: How to make a cheery Daffodil flower

Daffodils are a lovely, bright, cheery spring flower, they’re hard to find at other times of the year. Bring a bit of sunshine in with this cheery daffodil craft!

How to make a cheery Daffodil

You will need:
Some yellow paper or card, card is better
Green lolly sticks or straws
Some yellow or orange mini muffin cases
Bostik Glu Dots

Kids Crafts: How to make a cheery Daffodil flower

How to make your daffodil:

Using a pencil, draw the outline of your flower on your yellow card and carefully cut it out. An adult might want to help with this part.

Using the Glu Dots, stick the green lolly stick or straw to the back of the flower.

Kids Crafts: How to make a cheery Daffodil flower

Using another Glu Dot, stick the mini muffin case in the middle of the flower. Now admire your pretty daffodil!

It’s as simple as that. They look great, we’ve made a few and stuck them around our kitchen. They’re a cheery reminder that spring is nearly sprung and that winter will soon be behind us for another year.

If you enjoyed this, you might also like these other Crafts:

Kids Crafts: How to make a cheery Daffodil flower